Friday, September 12, 2008

The Music and the Clay

When I’m playing the piano, I’ll turn only a little lamp on. In the dim light, something invisible, such as melody, becomes much concreter to me.
Some people play the music, but don’t actually listen to it. I listen to my music and enjoy playing it in different ways.
Music is like the clay. I don’t change the dimension or the weight of it, but the shape. Under my fingers, it can be made into a lovely flower or a hamburger. It depends on the emotions I express. In such a way, I control the music, instead of being limited by the set movement.
Different types of music have its own music clay. Each piece of clay has its own color and touch.
For example, if I want to use a color Simple, but bright. It also takes less time to practice, giving my own style more space. Playing his music is just like playing a piece of soft light clay. I can mold it easily, making more complicated statues.
Mozart’s music is obviously opposite to Bach. Every single music note he composed has his own emotion and style. His music clay has dark deep color and tough touch. It’s hard for me to make it into something detailed statues like rabbit. I can only change the round into a cube. As a result, the best way of playing Mozart’s music clay is appreciating, instead of adding too much my own feelings.
Above all, Chopin’s music is my favorite. It’s more romantic and is often filled with his sorrow. His music clay is also soft, but has the color of violet. Though it’s easier to be molded, its special color does confine my creativity. You may admit that a violet bird is a little bit strange. But I enjoy its soft and emotional melody, just like a sentimental woman.
To me, music is like the clay. I don’t play it well and skillfully, but I do play it in the way I enjoy. In the dim light, I feel like I can see or even touch the melody. And I can express who I am and what I think completely. Some may complain that playing the piano is boring, that’s because they don’t play it in the way of molding the clay.

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